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Title: Meat rabbit butchering video


Snowberry - December 10, 2009 06:12 PM (GMT)
I got my son to film me processing a fryer this past weekend. I made the video for a friend on Facebook who was new to butchering rabbits. I posted it on the Meatrabbits list and thought it might be useful for some of you on here who are thinking about culling or doing rabbits for meat. I use kitchen shears for the whole thing, since I'm not good with knives.
It is graphic and shows the kill. There is blood involved, so don't look if this turns your stomach.
The rabbit is smaller than I usually do for fryers, but I had an order for pet food this weekend. It is a Chihuahua with a medical problem and he can't eat any organ meats or regular dog food. His owner was out of meat, so I said I'd do these sooner.

I can actually work a bit faster, but Mike was standing RIGHT beside me, so I didn't have much elbow room to work.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBYv3I9cCgo

Keepee - December 10, 2009 06:18 PM (GMT)
What an EXCELLENT dislocation that was!! So nice and smooth.

Only 3 1/2 minutes too!!! WOW lol

Locket Lops - December 10, 2009 06:25 PM (GMT)
Thanks for posting that! I was just thinking today how I needed to find a video of someone broosticking. Perfect video.

Snowberry - December 10, 2009 06:27 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Keepee @ Dec 10 2009, 10:18 AM)
What an EXCELLENT dislocation that was!! So nice and smooth.

Only 3 1/2 minutes too!!! WOW lol

Thanks, Keepee. I've done a few of these over the years. ;)
Since it was a smaller rabbit, it didn't take much of a pull. You know how the tougher ones need a stronger stretch.

I can go pretty fast if I've got a few to do. Once I get warmed up, my technique improves and I can roll them through. I remember when I first started, they used to take me so long to do.

Snowberry - December 10, 2009 06:35 PM (GMT)
Glad it was useful, Laura. I had some hesitations about posting it publicly at first, but I figured it is a useful skill for people to know. You never know when you might have to cull a rabbit, and you want to be able to do it as quickly as possible.
I used to use bopping, but my aim really wasn't great and I'd sometimes whack my other hand along with the rabbit. Not so good since I am hitting hard when I do it.


AWall - December 10, 2009 06:45 PM (GMT)
Excellent video Donna!

Locket Lops - December 10, 2009 06:58 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Snowberry @ Dec 10 2009, 01:35 PM)
Glad it was useful, Laura. I had some hesitations about posting it publicly at first, but I figured it is a useful skill for people to know. You never know when you might have to cull a rabbit, and you want to be able to do it as quickly as possible.
I used to use bopping, but my aim really wasn't great and I'd sometimes whack my other hand along with the rabbit. Not so good since I am hitting hard when I do it.

:shy: How do you "bop" them. I know more than several breeders that use that phrase and I want to know how to do that too.....

wonder_woolies - December 10, 2009 07:44 PM (GMT)
Argh. I really wanted to see that but my own computer is not working and this one (the one the boys use) does not allow Youtube viewing. I'll have to fix that.

"Bopping" them is hitting them on the back of the head. Not so pretty, could be hard to do but it's effective. I pick them up by the two back legs. They relax and naturally put their head back. I take a tire iron and hit them on the spot on their head behind their ears. You have to hit them to kill - that's a serious blow. You want to do it right the first time. I take their heads off right away after that.

suburbanbunny - December 10, 2009 07:55 PM (GMT)
Excellent video Donna! :bow: :bow: :bow: :bow:

You are SUPER Speedy! :barbara:

Snowberry - December 10, 2009 07:57 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (wonder_woolies @ Dec 10 2009, 11:44 AM)
Argh. I really wanted to see that but my own computer is not working and this one (the one the boys use) does not allow Youtube viewing. I'll have to fix that.


I can send the video privately by email if your email is big enough. Just send me a PM if you want it.

I bop on the ground. Same location, just that the rabbit is on the ground. I really wouldn't trust my aim if I had to do it your way. I'm just not that co-ordinated. Never been great at hitting a baseball.
;)

OakRidgeRabbits - December 10, 2009 08:09 PM (GMT)
Whew! :barf: A little light headed after watching that!

I'm pretty certain now that I will never be able to process rabbits. But with that being said, I was pleasantly surprised at how quick and easy the broomsticking was. The rabbit seemed to have no idea what was going to happen, and seemed to be out quick. It would be a handy skill to have for sick or injured rabbits, although I don't know that I'd be confident enough to do it myself. :confused:

FallenOaksRabbitry - December 10, 2009 08:10 PM (GMT)
Very good presentation!! I like the use of rebar instead of an actual broomstick, heavier weight. I also like the idea of using kitchen shears as I always seem to nick myself when I use a knife. <_< You make the whole process seen very easy :) Good job!!

DevonGlen - December 10, 2009 08:18 PM (GMT)
Thank you so much Donna!

jmemt - December 10, 2009 08:29 PM (GMT)
Thank you Donna. Thats pretty close to the method I use when butchering, but I saw a few things you do the would make it even easier for me. I definatly need sharper kitchen shears. :)

happydaysrabbitry - December 10, 2009 08:48 PM (GMT)
Thanks Donna!
That way of broomstick seems alot better then what i used, like u pull up then back at same time. Now I know how to cull some rabbits and sick babies in the future. Thanks!

Locket Lops - December 10, 2009 08:51 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Snowberry @ Dec 10 2009, 02:57 PM)
I bop on the ground. Same location, just that the rabbit is on the ground. I really wouldn't trust my aim if I had to do it your way. I'm just not that co-ordinated. Never been great at hitting a baseball.
;)

:huh: Still don't understand.....

Keepee - December 10, 2009 09:07 PM (GMT)
You hit it on the head with a blunt object Laura. That's what bop means.

Snowberry - December 10, 2009 09:14 PM (GMT)
Yes, you use a heavy object to hit them on the head...but you want to do massive damage to the brainstem, which is located near the back of the head. I use a heavy wrench and I usually hit more than once just to be sure. But the pressure of the hit can cause ugly things to happen with the eyes...
I prefer the broomstick because I'm always sure the job is done. After I pull, there is nothing in between the head and the body...which is why it is so easy to cut through with the scissors.

Locket Lops - December 10, 2009 09:20 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Snowberry @ Dec 10 2009, 04:14 PM)
Yes, you use a heavy object to hit them on the head...but you want to do massive damage to the brainstem, which is located near the back of the head. I use a heavy wrench and I usually hit more than once just to be sure. But the pressure of the hit can cause ugly things to happen with the eyes...
I prefer the broomstick because I'm always sure the job is done. After I pull, there is nothing in between the head and the body...which is why it is so easy to cut through with the scissors.

Yea...I don't think I could bop them. Broomsticking is already hard enough to think about. Thanks guys...I have to do it soon. :(

sulphurspringrabbitry - December 10, 2009 09:24 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (OakRidgeRabbits @ Dec 10 2009, 03:09 PM)
Whew! :barf: A little light headed after watching that!

I'm pretty certain now that I will never be able to process rabbits. But with that being said, I was pleasantly surprised at how quick and easy the broomsticking was. The rabbit seemed to have no idea what was going to happen, and seemed to be out quick. It would be a handy skill to have for sick or injured rabbits, although I don't know that I'd be confident enough to do it myself. :confused:

Totally agree.

I like how that method doesn't have the rabbit suffering, but..I don't think I would be able to do that lol.

Good video though :)

Keepee - December 10, 2009 09:25 PM (GMT)
It's still hard for me to broomstick. Lots of taking deep breaths. :lol:

Snowberry - December 10, 2009 09:43 PM (GMT)
I'm impressed with the number of people brave enough to watch it.
I remember the days when I had to get my husband to do it. I'd put the rabbits in a carrier and then go all the way to the house...and come back when it was over.
There are rabbits that are harder for me to deal with than others, but I feel that sometimes a quick death is preferable to any suffering they might do.

I have done so many rabbits over the years, that I can go about it pretty matter of factly. Once I've decided, I just go and do it. There are days when I'm in the wrong mood emotionally, and then I have to wait. What usually prompts me is a day of cleaning rabbit trays. If I have too many rabbits and ones that I KNOW shouldn't stick around, I will make the decision and deal with it.


victorylanerabbitry - December 10, 2009 09:45 PM (GMT)
I don't think I am able to emotionally see the video, but can someone explain the 'broonstick' method...just for curiosity. :)

Erins Bunnies - December 10, 2009 09:53 PM (GMT)
Thank you for posting that Donna, that's really helpful.
Someone was telling me you can get more meat than you'd think off of a Himalayan, so I'm thinking about growing out one and giving it a try, especially now I've got a good example of it.

Keepee - December 10, 2009 09:57 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Erins Bunnies @ Dec 10 2009, 04:53 PM)
Thank you for posting that Donna, that's really helpful.
Someone was telling me you can get more meat than you'd think off of a Himalayan, so I'm thinking about growing out one and giving it a try, especially now I've got a good example of it.

Hollands and nethies are pretty meaty too!!!

Celestial_Wind - December 10, 2009 10:10 PM (GMT)
Whooo I am a little quizy now!
Awesome video and know I know how to "cull" a bunny if needed...I dont know if I would ever beable to do it myself unless no choice but well worth seeing how

Snowberry - December 10, 2009 10:34 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (victorylanerabbitry @ Dec 10 2009, 01:45 PM)
I don't think I am able to emotionally see the video, but can someone explain the 'broonstick' method...just for curiosity. :)

You put a bar across the rabbit's head right at the back of the skull. I rest my foot gently on the one end of the bar to steady it, but apply no pressure. Then step down hard with the other foot, followed by an immediate pull up and stretch (holding the rabbit's back legs). It ends up being one smooth movement. It is very fast, and the spinal cord (and spine) is separated.

Snowberry - December 10, 2009 10:56 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Celestial_Wind @ Dec 10 2009, 02:10 PM)
Whooo I am a little quizy now!
Awesome video and know I know how to "cull" a bunny if needed...I dont know if I would ever beable to do it myself unless no choice but well worth seeing how

My first culling was a no choice...I was home alone and had a rabbit with a badly broken leg. I cried, but did the deed.

There are different levels of tolerance for visuals of stuff like this. I have a pretty strong stomach, so it doesn't bother me at all to see the insides. Looks the same as the stuff at the meat counter to me. I've seen liver and heart etc. all in the grocery store. It is something you can desensitize yourself to.
I think it would make me a great first aid attendant if I ever decided to go into that.

Locket Lops - December 10, 2009 11:08 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Snowberry @ Dec 10 2009, 05:34 PM)
QUOTE (victorylanerabbitry @ Dec 10 2009, 01:45 PM)
I don't think I am able to emotionally see the video, but can someone explain the 'broonstick' method...just for curiosity. :)

You put a bar across the rabbit's head right at the back of the skull. I rest my foot gently on the one end of the bar to steady it, but apply no pressure. Then step down hard with the other foot, followed by an immediate pull up and stretch (holding the rabbit's back legs). It ends up being one smooth movement. It is very fast, and the spinal cord (and spine) is separated.

To further the visual...since I had a hard time picturing it at first...Keep explained it to me like you are pulling a weed. ;)

Snowberry - December 10, 2009 11:44 PM (GMT)
QUOTE (Locket Lops @ Dec 10 2009, 03:08 PM)

To further the visual...since I had a hard time picturing it at first...Keep explained it to me like you are pulling a weed. ;)

LOL. That's just about right...some weeds come out easier than others.

Cassidy - December 11, 2009 01:13 AM (GMT)
Wow you guys are really brave, to have the heart to take away an animal's life like that.

AWall - December 11, 2009 02:10 AM (GMT)
Cassidy, the rabbit was used for meat. It was not senselessly killed. Your comment makes no sense to me.

Cassidy - December 11, 2009 02:11 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (AWall @ Dec 10 2009, 09:10 PM)
Cassidy, the rabbit was used for meat. It was not senselessly killed. Your comment makes no sense to me.

Yeah I know lol it would just be really hard and sad to kill them!

AWall - December 11, 2009 02:14 AM (GMT)
Yes it is difficult at first but people (and animals) must eat and in other cases the rabbit is suffering. If it bothers you so much, perhaps you should overlook meat rabbit threads in the future.

Cassidy - December 11, 2009 02:19 AM (GMT)
Ok sowwy... :P (at least I didn't watch the video!)

Starlight - December 11, 2009 03:06 AM (GMT)
Agreed. If it bothers you, then don't read these threads. Its a fact of life. Its neve easy or fun to kill an animal(i'd be pretty worried about anyone who does like it...)

Anyway, thanks so much for the video! I always heard about the broomstick method, but Im a visual learner, so seeing it actually done really helps me more.

Snowberry - December 11, 2009 05:37 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (Cassidy @ Dec 10 2009, 05:13 PM)
Wow you guys are really brave, to have the heart to take away an animal's life like that.

"In the USA, 24 million chickens are killed every 24 hours. That would be 8,760,000,000 chickens eaten per year in the USA."

Someone had to kill every one of those chickens so we could eat. This is not to mention the millions of cows, pigs, sheep, goats and rabbits that we also eat.
Every single one of those was alive, cute and furry/feathered. It isn't heart that makes me able to do this. It is that I know where meat comes from and how it gets to my table and I am willing to do it myself.

If you want to be a vegetarian or a vegan, fine. I was a vegetarian for 2 years. When I decided to eat meat again, I decided that I would be able to process it myself.
If this really bothers you, don't bother reading the clearly labelled meat rabbit threads. Many people are wanting to learn how to provide their own food for themselves, rather than relying on the mega agricultural corporations to do it for them. People want to be able to use their culls for their own table and pet food. In order for animals to be eaten, there is killing involved.

Death is part of nature and the cycle of life. Rather than putting it out of sight and mind and rejecting it, it is better to understand it. It is hard and it can be 'ugly', which is why I said people are brave to be able to watch. It is something we can learn to take responsibilty for...we don't have to because we can buy our meat, but I feel it is a useful skill to know.

LoveYourGuts - December 11, 2009 11:43 AM (GMT)
I am extremely impressed with the speed that you completed that in... It was a pretty wham bam thank you ma'am fashion. So bravo for that! I opened the video up and my boyfriend was like omfg what are you watching :blink:.

Anyway I do have a question which is probably grotesque but I would rather ask then have something go horribly wrong...

About how much pressure are you actually putting on the rabbit when you pull up during the broom sticking? And if you apply too much do you have to worry about, for lack of a better word, beheading? Because I would rather not apply too much pressure in order to make sure I did it right and accidentally decapitate a bun... :shock:

TIA

wooly_queen - December 11, 2009 01:24 PM (GMT)
I can't imagine eating bunnies because I keep them as pets...I snuggle them and take their pictures on hoildays...I just cant imagine eating them. lol

I was kinda curious...I couldn't watch the video because I would have probably cried. =P I tried to read everyones comments, but that made me kinda sick...so I'll just go now. lol

Keepee - December 11, 2009 02:51 PM (GMT)
Loveyourguts, I do believe you can behead them on accident, if you pull too hard. I've never done it, thank god! LOL

Really though, it would be gross, but much better than not pulling hard enough and having to do a do over!




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