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 1983 Leppert, Tammy Lynn July 6, 1983, Cocoa Beach
PorchlightUSA
Posted: Jul 13 2006, 08:58 AM


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http://www.geocities.com/findtammy/

Her sister's site for Tammy. Please look. so young, so beautiful, so talented.
Where is she?
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PorchlightUSA
Posted: Jun 22 2007, 06:29 PM


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Tammy Lynn Leppert



*Missing since July 6, 1983 from Cocoa Beach, Brevard County, Florida.*



Classification: Endangered Missing



Date Of Birth: February 5, 1965

Age at Time of Disappearance: 18 years old

Height and Weight at Time of Disappearance: 5'4; 105 pounds

Distinguishing Characteristics: Caucasian. Curly blonde hair; hazel eyes.



Leppert, a teen-model who specialized in posing for swimsuit ads and played bit parts in Scarface and Spring Break, left her house barefoot and without money. Leppert, whose resume lists Miss Teen Florida and Miss Sun and Surf titles among her accomplishments, drove away with a male friend, who later told police he left her outside a Cocoa Beach bank after an argument.



Serial-killer Christopher Wilder is a suspect in her disappearance. He is also a suspect in the disappearances of Colleen Orsborn and Mary Opitz.



Leppert was last seen wearing a blue blouse with flower appliques on the shoulder and a denim skirt. She was not wearing shoes, nor was she carrying a purse.

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PorchlightUSA
Posted: Jun 22 2007, 06:53 PM


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http://icaremissingpersonscoldcases.yuku.com/

findtammylynnleppert@yahoo.com
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Posted: Jun 22 2007, 06:54 PM


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Posted: Aug 21 2007, 02:41 PM


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http://www.charleyproject.org/cases/l/leppert_tammy.html

Tammy Lynn Leppert




Top Two Rows and Bottom Right: Leppert, circa 1983;
Bottom Center and Left: Age-progressions to an unknown age


Vital Statistics at Time of Disappearance

Missing Since: July 6, 1983 from Rockledge, Florida
Classification: Endangered Missing
Date Of Birth: February 5, 1965
Age: 18 years old
Height and Weight: 5'4 - 5'5, 105 - 115 pounds
Distinguishing Characteristics: Caucasian female. Curly blonde hair, hazel eyes. Leppert may spell her first name "Tammi." She occasionally uses Tammi and/or Tami-Lyn as stage names.
Clothing/Jewelry Description: A blue denim skirt, a light blue shirt with flower appliques on the shoulders, and flip-flops.
Medical Conditions: Leppert may have been three months pregnant at the time of her disappearance, but this has not been confirmed. She was apparently suffering from emotional problems at the time of her disappearance.


Details of Disappearance

Leppert left her family's home in Rockledge, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on July 6, 1983 with a male friend. Her friend later told authorities that he and Leppert had an argument while driving and that he left her standing in a parking lot outside the Glass Bank near an Exxon gasoline station in the vicinity of State Road A1A between 2nd Street North and 3rd Street North in Cocoa Beach, Florida.
Leppert carried a gray purse when she went missing. Many reports erroneously state that she was barefoot at the time of her disappearance. Her mother said she noticed Leppert had not combed her hair before leaving the house that day, which is very uncharacteristic of her; she usually spent considerable time on her appearance before going anywhere. At the time of her disappearance, Leppert was planning to go to California to act in some movies. She apparently never arrived there, however.

Investigators looked into the possibility that Leppert was attacked by Christopher Wilder, a man linked to at least a dozen disappearances, rapes, murders and/or attacks of women in the early to mid-1980s. Photos of Wilder are posted below this case summary. He frequented the Florida region at the time of Leppert's disappearance. He sometimes attempted to lure young female victims by offering non-existent "modeling sessions" or other tactics, which would have fit well into a scenario involving Leppert. She was a relatively known model who had won several titles and was an occasional actress, landing bit parts in the films Scarface and Spring Break, and she wanted to be an internationally famous star.

Wilder, whose history of violence towards women went back to his adolescent years, was put on probation in 1980 after pleading guilty to attempted sexual battery towards a teenage girl. While on a visit home to Australia that same year, he was charged with kidnapping and sexually assaulting two teenaged girls. His parents bailed him out of jail and he flew back to the United States, promising to return for his trial which was set for April 1984.

Wilder is a also a suspect in the Florida disappearances of Mary Opitz, Colleen Orsborn, Rosario Gonzales, and Elizabeth Kenyon. He was killed during a shootout with authorities in 1984. Leppert's family filed a one-million-dollar lawsuit against Wilder before his death, but dropped the suit afterwards. Leppert's mother, modeling agent Linda Curtis, later stated that she never believed Wilder was involved in Leppert's disappearance. Police have never been able to link Wilder and Leppert and it may be coincidence that she disappeared at the same time he was targeting area models. He had a long history of sex crimes but did not begin his killing spree until a year after Leppert vanished.

John Crutchley, the so-called Vampire Rapist, is also considered a possible suspect in Leppert's case. He received a life sentence in prison after kidnapping and raping a woman in Orlando, Florida and drinking her blood. Crutchley committed suicide in prison in 2002. He has never been linked to Leppert.

Curtis criticized the police for allegedly mishandling the investigation into Leppert's disappearance. Police initially believed she ran away, and some continue to think that foul play was not involved in her case. Curtis said her daughter was afraid of the man who last saw her, and that the individual was never properly investigated. Authorities say they did the best they could to find Leppert and the man she was last seen with has been interviewed is not a viable suspect in her case.

On June 1, a month before Leppert vanished, she began acting erratically at her home. She yelled and screamed and broke a window with a baseball bat. Curtis took Leppert to a mental health center for a 72-hour observation after she calmed down. Psychiatrists there could not find anything wrong with her. Curtis planned to get a therapist for Leppert, but she disappeared before that could be arranged.

Curtis believed that Leppert may have been kidnapped and murdered as a result of her knowledge of a large-scale drug and money laundering operation in Brevard, Florida. The operation allegedly involved many prominent local citizens. Leppert was reportedly afraid for her life because of what she knew. She stayed in her bedroom more than usual and refused to drink from open containers or eat from her own plate. Curtis claimed Leppert made a police report about what she knew, but investigators have no record of the report and do not espouse Curtis's theory.

Leppert's sister is still looking for her and believes her mother's theory about Leppert's disappearance. Curtis moved to Orlando, Florida after her daughter's disappearance. She in 1995.

The missing persons organization Child Protection Education of America states that Leppert had no cavities or fillings at the time of her disappearance; however, this is unproven. Her dental records have been lost. Some agencies incorrectly state that Leppert's home is in Cocoa Beach, Florida.



Above Images: Wilder


Investigating Agency
If you have any information concerning this case, please contact:
Cocoa Beach Police Department
407-868-3269
OR
321-868-3251
OR
Suzanne
Tammy Leppert's Sister
Suzannec4444@yahoo.com



Source Information
Christopher Wilder Biography
The Child Seek Network
The National Center for Missing Adults
The Doe Network
I Care---missing persons cold cases - Message Board - Yuku
Missing Adults -- Missing Children
Tammy Lynn Leppert is Missing
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Posted: Mar 18 2008, 07:27 PM


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Dying Mother Keeps Fighting for clues to Daughter's fate
By Billy Cox
Florida Today
Sept 20, 1995

Linda Curtis always thought the truth about her daughter eventually would leak through. Whether by fluke or coincidence, a mystery witness, or an overlooked detail, somebody, somewhere had to know something.

But now, a dozen years after Tami Lynn Leppert was last seen alive in Cocoa Beach, and three years after the story went coast-to-coast in TV's "Unsolved Mysteries," Curtis is running out of time. At age 54, the talent scout/modeling agent is months, perhaps weeks from dying, without enough money to cover her own funeral expenses.

So, from her bed in Florida Hospital in Orlando, where dialysis has kept her alive for the past four weeks, Curtis is making a final appeal:

"There's always the possibility that somebody will feel sorry for me. I don't want anybody to feel sorry for me," she declares in a voice just above a whisper, "but if that's what it takes to get the right person to come forward, that's OK."

"I won't be able to bring charges against anybody. I just want to know."

Curtis was rejected six weeks ago by Shands Hospital in Gainesville as a liver/kidney transplant candidate, because of her degenerative heart disease. With both organs in the final stages of collapse, Curtis plans to leave the hospital and spend her final days at home in Orlando.

As owner of Galaxy Productions on Merritt Island, Curtis' track record for turning youngsters into beauty contest and talent show winners -- complete with big money incentives -- drew reams of national attention during the 1980s, from ABC's "20/20" to Life Magazine. Her prize student was her own daughter, Tami Lynn Leppert.

Leppert -- a veteran of more than 400 pageants beginning at age 4 -- was earning bit parts in movies such as "Scarface" and "Spring Break" before her disappearance in 1983.

Leppert's behavior turned paranoid and violent that summer. She said she had witnessed something she wasn't suppossed to see. She refused to eat from her own plate and insisted that people were trying to kill her.

The popular, 18-year-old Rockledge resident last was reported walking along State Road A1A near Cocoa Beach's Glass Bank building on July 6. Cocoa Beach police pegged Leppert for a runaway, but she has never been seen or heard from since.

Curtis advanced more elaborate theories, complete with names, but nothing panned out. Local private investigator Mike Angeline, a former classmate of Leppert's, followed up dozens of leads generated by "Unsolved Mysteries" to no avail.

Leppert's disappearance initially was linked to serial killer Christopher Wilder, who abducted Satellite Beach model Terry Ferguson from Merritt Square Mall and is thought to have murdered her in 1984.

From her hospital bed, Linda Curtis holds a photo of her daughter, Tami Lynn Leppert. The popular 18-year-old was last seen walking along State Road a1a in Cocoa Beach on July 6, 1983

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Posted: Mar 18 2008, 07:39 PM


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In 1988, Leppert's name appeared on a law enforcement task force list of potential victims of John Crutchley. Crutchley, the so-called "vampire rapist," is serving time for 1986 convictions of kidnapping and rape, and he remains a suspect in a number of unsolved murders. But, according to Brevard County sherriff's spokesperson Stacey Hall, "John Crutchley is not currently a suspect in the disappearance of Tami Leppert."

Curtis was virtually disabled in a car accident in 1983. Several years later, she moved to Orlando, where, for the last two years, she has been confined to a wheelchair. Longtime friend Wing Flanagan, who she calls "my adopted son," has been at her side for the entire ordeal.

"How would you reconcile this?" says Flanagan, 28, a professional photographer, "If she knew Tami was dead, she could at least know that she'd be reunited with her soon. But Linda doesn't even know that."

Unable to sit up now, Curtis says she bears no ill will toward the people she feels are responsible for her daughter's disappearance.

"You have to learn to forgive. That's the most important lesson in life," Curtis says. "You don't have to like it. But you have to forgive and then move on. What good does hate do? eople should never hate. It doesn't help them."

Looking back, Curtis says one of the first films she ever saw -- "Peter Pan" -- turned out to be not only her favorite, but her daughter's favorite as well. The cinematic treatment about the boy who never wanted to grow up apparently wove symbolic threads throughout their lives.

"I always wanted to grow up to be Wendy, so I could take care of Peteer Pan," she says, "When I found out Peter Pan wasn't real, it broke my heart."

At age 5, Leppert, enamoured of the big screen, told her mother she wanted to act. "Not that she wanted to be a movie star," Curtis remembers, "but that she wanted to be an actress. That was her goal."

Curtis made a career of surrounding herself with children, schooling them in the arts of stage and poise.

"I've worked with children of all ages, from detention centers to Sunday schools," she says. "And the rewards I've gotten from them have been miracles in themselves. I've enjoyed every minute of it. Because each child is special, each child is pure. They all have a unique talent. Sometimes, you just have to wait a little bit for it to show."

Curtis concedes that living for 12 years without knowing hwer daughter's fate has exacted a toll. In a curious twist of life and art, Curtis is now the caretaker of an image -- suspended in memory -- of the child that never grew up.

"But the Lord says He won't give you anything more than you can handle," Curtis says. "Sometimes you question that. But somehow, I've handled it. I've managed to do that. He tought me that I'm stronger than I thought."


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--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MOTHER DIES WITHOUT AN ANSWER TO MYSTERY OF MISSING DAUGHTER
by Billy Cox
Florida Today
Oct 5, 1995

Modeling Agent, Linda Curtis, died early Wednesday morning without resolving her greatest sorrow -- the fate of her daughter.

Curtis, 54, passed away at Florida Hospital in Orlando, following a blood infection she contracted over the weekend. She had been diagnosed as terminally ill months ago from kidney and liver failure.

"We kept her going through artificial means for as long as we could. Those were her wishes," said photographer Wing Flanagan, her longtime partner, "Her heart just gave out."

A Cocoa native, Curtis attained nationsl prominence in the 1980s for coaching so many girls to victory in beauty pageants. In 1983, however, her life turned upside down with the disappearance of her 18-year0old daughter, Tami Lynn Leppert.

Leppert, a model and aspiring actress, vanished without a trace from Cocoa Beach, where she was last seen near the Glass Bank. Curtis moved to Orlando shortly thereafter.

"Unsolved Mysteries" solicited leads nationwide in 1992, but repeated showings of the Leppert episode produced dead ends. Curtis made a final public appeal for help in Florida Today three weeks ago.

Funeral arrangements were not available Wednesday.


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Posted: Mar 18 2008, 07:51 PM


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A fan's letter to Tammy

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--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Whatever Happened to Tami-Lynn Leppert?

7 years ago, model says goodbye, hasn't been heard from since




I like this place, I've lived here all my life, and I'd like to stay here. ever since I was a little girl, I've always
dreamed of having a house in cocoa beach and living happily ever after.

-Tami-lynn leppert, March 1983


It was the last interview she gave before the fairy tale disintegrated, And she was good at it: Poised engaging, An easy
smile that could melt glacial skepticism. Naturally she was good. She was a pro. Four hundred-ten talent and beauty
contests since age 4. Two hundred-eighty trophies.
She just turned 18. And she was at a crossroad. Her latest flirtation with hollywood-a cinemetic turkey called
"Spring Break"-had just been released.But she harbored no illusions about it. Her non-speaking role as a bikinied nymphet
carried no more weight than her erlier camoes in "Little Darlings" and "Scarface."
What "Spring Break" represented was the latest stop in a carefully nurtured ascent to movie stardom. If visibility
management meant getting tami's curvaceous hips splashed across a movie poster (Four college dudes erecting a
"Spring Break" flag atop them, Reminiscent of the allied triumph at Iwo Jima), That was good enough for now.
And if Tami-Lynn leppert felt compelled to feign embarrasment over this no-talent coup by crossing her eyes and making a
goofy face, These were times for celebration.
Or so it seemed.
At least three producers were talking major roles in upcoming projects. One critic, Steve Walz, Was projecting her to be
"One of the stars of the 80's" involving her name in the same breath with Brooke Shields and insisting, "She's not just
another dumb blonde"
Model, Dancer, Beauty Queen, Covergirl at age 13. Five-feet five, Hazel eyes, 105 pounds. A can't miss resume. A magnetic
aura that turned the heads of men and boys alike, Pulling strangers and their promises into her orbit.
But somewhere inside those invisible walls, Beyond the curiosity of judges and talent scouts, A bomb was ticking. Those
familiar with the sound never understood until it was much too late:
The weight of expectations.
A web of paranoia.
Broken glass.

On July 6, 1983, Tami-lynn Leppert went for a ride and vanished so cleanly it was as if she'd never existed.
Nearly seven years later, Beneath the cobwebs of distance. There isn't even a shrine to commemorate what was. Only a
question: Was Tami the architect and star of the perfect getaway or the victim of a perfect crime?

TAMI'S MOTHER/AGENT
Linda Curtis moved from Brevard County three years ago,
Primarily to shake the emptiness she felt every time
she saw something that reminded her of Tami.
Which was always.
curtis lives in orlando, Where she conducts her modeling business from a home she only half-jokingly refers to as
"The Cave." An artist with eccentric notions stucco edifice himself-Its few windows are primarily ventilation caliber.
Having been spotlighted nationally by life magazine and ABC's "20/20" for her talents as one of America's most succesful
child modeling agents. Curtis might well be expected to enjoy a lifestyle commensurate with her abilities.
But nothing ever come easy for Linda Curtis.
After a series of heart attacks, Chronic diabetes and a ruptured tendon in her foot, her mobility is relegated to a walker
and a wheelchair. She doesn't want her picture taken. And there is the heavy emotional baggage to contend with, Which includes
two husbands, Five children and rip-offs by business assotiates
By 1983 only daughter Tami remained a part of her household. Today, Even Tami is a memory-which Curtis is still attempting
to manage, Via book and a screen-play.
Predictably, The story will accent all those magic moments only a mother can recite so well:
The time her nine-year-old daughter surrendered a beauty pageant to the broken hearted runner-up after an official mistakenly
announced the other girl the winner, The time Tami " sold more Girl Scout cookies than anyone else in Brevard County".
Tami as a philanthropist who made special visits to Brevard County Detention Center inmates on Christmas Eve: A popular
little girl who "Was always sticking up for the underdog."
But Curtis plans to unsheathe a more pointed edge in the book. Contrary to what some people think, she insists that her
daughter was no runaway. Tami, she charges, was yanked into the shadows by a conspiracy involving prominent Brevardians
whose names, would make trial lawyers eyes light up with dollar signs.
" I want people over there to know I'm writing a book," She says referring to a project (no actual names used) she's been
tolling over for months. "I want to shake them up. I want the criminal to know they can't absorb my child-or anyone's child-
wothout ulimately paying the penalty for it."

TAMI-LYNN LEPPERT
now resides in the computer memory bank of Florida Crime Information center. A comunity of 5,944, roughly the size of Indian
Harbour Beach. She can be found there alongside another cocoa beach entry Keith D. Fleming. who vanished in 1977 at age 13.
Cocoa Beach Police Capt. Bob Wicker is mildly indignant over curtis' allegation that his department blew the investigation
of Tami's disappearance. He says he coudn't find a hint of foul play.
"I can't say there was anything unusual about the case. Other than some faintly problems I understand she was having at
home" Wicker says. "The agent in charge was a real go-getter. He he was the type the sees communists behind every tree,
if you know what I mean."
The case fell into the departments lap when Tami, a Rockledge resident, was last reported seen in Cocoa Beach. Among other
things, Curtis says the young man who picked up her daughter up on the morning of July 6, 1983, was never thoroughly
interrogated. She says that Tami once told her that she feared the same man-A businessman-wanted to kill her.
Wicker dismisses.
"Nothing in the report has him down as a suspect" He says. "We have no reason to believe he did anything wrong, at this
time."
Wicker says he has no current Address on the man Tami was last seen with. Because the case is still pending, he says,
records on the investigation remain closed.

"FAMILY PROBLEMS"
Tami-Lynn Leppert lived in fear shortly before she vanished. Strangers prowled around the eyes of those she knew best.
She woudn't drink from open containers; She only ate food from someone else's plate, Not hers; She stayed in her room and
refused to answer the door. Linda Curtis concedes these things. She says she got her first glimpse of deterioration the
year before, When Tami broke down on the set of Brian DePalma's cocaine-war thriller, "Scarface." A blood-and-guts scene
during the filming sent her into hysterics.
But Curtis insists that Tami's authentic tears were rooted in a confession that would consume her. Tami told her mother that
how in an effort to score points, a friend bragged to her on a large-scale, drug-money laundering operation in Brevard. Cops,
Bankers, Leading citizens-the people in on the take were powerful, powerful enough to make Tami fear she knew too much.
Curtis says she told Tami to make a report with the Brevard County Sheriff's Department.
Officer Mike Wong, now with the department's drug task force , says he vaguely remembers his meeting with Tami. "It was so
long ago," Wong says "and the best I can recollect , the the conversation didn't have anything to do with anyone trying to
kill her. I think she came in to talk about some stolen propety she wanted back."
Wong expresses bewilderment over the drug scenario. "the last I heard, they thought that racecar driver was involved."
That referance is to serial killer Christopher Wilder.
Before he was shot to death in a tussle with a state trooper on the canadian border in spring 1984, Wilder's murder spree
lanced Brevard. The FBI linked Wilder-A Grand Prix aficianado who posed as a fashion phographer-with the abduction and
murder aspiring Satelite Beach model Terry Ferguson , last seen at Merritt square mall.
Curtis filled a $1 million wrongul death sult against wilders astate that year. She says Wilder met her daughter daughter
on the set of "Spring Break" in fort lauderdale and traveled to Brevard in a fruitless effort to convince Curtis to let
him photograph Tami.
Curtis said she never considered Wilder a strong suspect. She says she only sued the Wilder estate luring the manhunt to
force him to answer questions about Tami. She dropped the lawsuit after wilder's death.

RICK ADAMS
WAS one of the few people Tami-Lynn Leppert trusted to the end. "It's hard to say why, really" Adams says. "Maybe it's
because I never really wanted anything from her. "now 27, Adams sifts through his pictures. Pointing out the times he
escorted her to both his junior and senior proms at Cocoa High School. It was one of those hard-to-catagorize teen-age
relationships-not exactly a hot romance, but not exactly little sister/big brother either. He knows only one thing for sure
"She could've dated anybody she wanted to. "They drifted apart after he graduated. Perhaps that was inevitable."Tami had alot
of pressure about her apearance in public, "Adam recalls. "Because of who she was, she felt like she had this image she had
to live up to. Everything she did was, like, fine-tooth combed. Her make up had to be just right, every hair had to be in
place, what she wore had to be perfect. It drove me crazy, to tell the truth. I got burned out on the whole thing, with with
so many people hanging around, so many people coming up to her. It was almost like having to compete for attention, and I
wasn't into that." but shortly before she disappeared, Adams says Tami began confiding in him, telling him that someone was
trying to kill her. He says the fear was real. "I knew it wasn't drugs. I can say for sure that Tami wasn't into drugs. She
didn't even drink. "Finally, on Tuesday evening July 5, 1983. Tami told Adam she had "seen something she shouldn't have
seen" She didn't get aspecific. They went to pray at Rockville Evangel Temple. "Tami cried as hard as I've seen anyone cry
before" Adams says.He dropped her off in front of her house around 11 that night . They made pland to go back to church
wednsday afternoon."And then." Adams says "She looked at me and said. I just want you to know that I may have to go away for
a while. But I also want you to know that I love you."
Then they hugged each other, and held the embrace for as long as it took.
Rick Adams never got a chance to ask her what she meant. He called late the next morning to reconfirm their date.
She was already gone.

CURTIS CONCEDES TAMI
had been restless, that her career hadn't advances as quickly as she wanted. She says Tami was preparing to pursue some
acting leads waiting for her in California.
But paranioa engulfed her first. It was the last of June, first of July 1983.
"Tami went outside for some reason-which seemed strange, considering how she afraid to go outside-when the door slammed
and locked behind her. I think a gust of wind caught it." Curtis says. "Anyway, she went berserk. She bashed the window with
a baseball bat she picked up in the front yard, and she reached her and inside to unlock the door. "She came running in,
Yelling and screaming, but before she could do anything I pinned her against the wall and kept saying. " I love you, Tami I
love you Tami, over and over again, And then she went limp."
The next day Curtis checked Tami into the Brevard mental health center for 72 hour observation. " Then they released her and
said she was normal as far as they could tell." Curtis says. "So we were all set to check her with another psycho therapist.
But We were too late."
Curtis was sitting in the house that wednsday morning when she heard a car horn beep out front. Tami peered out the window
and went out the door. she was wearing a light blue blouse, a denim shirt and was barefoot. She stuck her head back in and
said "bye mommy, I'll see you in a little bit, OK?"
"For some reason, I was preoccupied that day and I didn't pay much attention to it, and I'll never forgive myself for that."
Curtis says. On the other hand since her daughter did not have her purse. curtis didn't think she was going far.
Ten minutes later, Curtis heard the car engine crank up. She rose to see what was going on. Tami was riding away in the
car of the young man she suppossedly feared.
It was 11 a.m. Linda Curtis never saw her daughter again.

THE LAST REPORTED
contact Tami attempted came in a flurry of calls she made that wednesday afternoon.
Three times she left urgent messages for her aunt, Ginger Kolsch, at Kolsch's Cocoa Beach costume shop, Balloonatics. Kolsch
was out of town, Tami said she was calling from a nearby location.
"Tami was definately afraid of somebody," Kolsch says. "It was real, I'm convinced of that."
Kolsch says the runaway scenario doesn't wash.

"DID YOU EVER
see her play Peter Pan?" asks Rick Adams. "Linda's got it on video."
The performance in an enduring image in Adams' memory, a special place for the little girl he thought was destined to be a star.
This is the one where Tami-Lynn Leppert, dressed as the famous boy-who-wouldn't-grow-up, is confronted with a dying Tinkerbell
poisoned by the notorious Captain Hook. And the only way to save Tinkerbell's life is to rally the support of the audience.
"Oh, please, please, everyone who believes in fairies, clap your hands!" Tami urges.
Grief and fear come trickling down Tami's cheeks so easily it flows like blood from a fresh wound.
"Please!"she continues with greater conviction, "Louder! Oh please, louder!"
The audience responds with lusty, award-winning applause and Tami's tears of sorrow smear with tears of relief.
Tinkerbell lives.
"She could make you cry, man," Adams says, "That was Tami at her best. She had the gift."
A fountain of sorrow, forever young.


Florida Today March 18, 1990
By Billy Cox

http://www.angelsmissing.com/forum/TAMMY-L...ISSING-t57.html


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Posted: Mar 18 2008, 10:13 PM


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Miami Herald, The (FL)
May 8, 1984

Edition: FINAL
Section: LOCAL
Page: 1D

Index Terms:
MASS MURDER KIDNAP PROBE LAWSUIT FLORIDA LOST

MOTHER OF MISSING MODEL SUES WILDER ESTATE

Author: BRIAN RICHARDSON Herald Staff Writer


The mother of a 17-year-old Merritt Island model who disappeared in 1983 has filed a claim of more than $1 million against the estate of Christopher Bernard Wilder.
The claim, filed in Palm Beach County Probate Court, accuses Wilder of abducting and possibly killing Tammi Lynn Leppert on July 6, 1983.

That was almost eight months before Wilder, 39, allegedly began a nationwide spree of kidnapping, rape and murder that ended April 13 with his death in a struggle with New Hampshire state police.
Police throughout the country suspect Wilder in the abduction, rape or murder of at least 12 women.
The claim is the third to be filed against Wilder's estate, but the two previous claims were unrelated to the murders Wilder is accused of committing.
The parents of at least one of his apparent victims outside Florida have filed suit against the estate, and more suits are expected, but the claims have yet to appear in Probate Court.
In her claim, Linda Curtiss, Leppert's mother, charges that Wilder "did abduct, kidnap, assault and do a great deal of bodily harm ... intentionally causing ... Tammi Lynn Leppert to meet her violent and untimely death, demise and/or disappearance."
Leppert has never been found. Monday, an FBI spokesman in Tampa said agents were still unable to connect Wilder to her disappearance.
"There's so many of these things," said Dave Milroy. "They're running down all the leads. We're not sure if there's anything there or not. I don't know what she's using for a basis."
Curtiss owns Galaxy Model Workshop in Merritt Island. After looking at photographs of Wilder, she said, she was positive he visited her agency on several occasions in 1983.
"
Tammi> worked part time for me," she said. "He talked to her; she was his contact."
Wilder's will leaves most of his estate to his parents in Australia. His representatives valued the estate when the will was probated at $445,100. More than $410,000 of that is in real estate.
Curtiss' claim asks for compensatory damages in excess of $1 million for her mental anguish, pain and suffering, the loss of value of her daughter's estate, and funeral expenses.
Cecil T. Farrington, the Fort Lauderdale lawyer handling Wilder's estate, said Monday that he had not received a copy of the claim.
Under state law, claims must be filed against the estate within three months after Wilder's will was probated late in April. If the estate objects to a claim, the matter ultimately can be resolved by a jury.
"We believe we have a valid circumstantial case, and we wish to pursue it," said Mark J. Friedman, Curtiss' lawyer. "Basically we've got the smoking gun and the missing body. Let a jury decide about the possibilities."
According to the claim, Leppert was making more than $20,000 a year as a model when she disappeared. Her income partially supported her mother, the claim states.
Leppert, who had modeled and acted since she was 4 years old, didn't come home the evening of July 6. She left her house that day barefoot and without money, wearing a blue denim skirt and blue blouse.
"She used to call me about three times a day, even when she was on assignments in Miami or New York," Curtiss said. "My phone bills will attest to that. Then all of a sudden, one day she walks out the door and she never calls again. Where is she?"
Curtiss' hopes for her daughter's return dimmed in March, when 21-year-old Theresa Ferguson, an aspiring model, disappeared from a Merritt Island shopping mall. Ferguson's body was found later, about 100 miles west in Polk County's Green Swamp. Police suspect Wilder in that case, too.
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PorchlightUSA
Posted: Mar 19 2008, 12:00 AM


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Miami Herald, The (FL)
April 12, 1984

Edition: PLM BCH
Section: LOCAL
Page: 1C


WILDER LINK SEEN IN ANOTHER CASE

Author: DORY OWENS Herald Staff Writer
The FBI is investigating a possible link between the disappearance of a 17-year-old Merritt Island model and Christopher Wilder, the suspect in a series of abductions and murders.
Tammi Lynn Leppert, a blonde, hazel-eyed beauty who had modeled and acted since age 4, was last seen in July in Cocoa Beach.
When Leppert didn't come home the evening of July 6, her mother grew frightened. Her hopes for Leppert's reLeppert turn dimmed further last month when Theresa Ferguson, a 21-year- old aspiring model, disappeared from a Merritt Island shopping mall.
Ferguson was later found dead about 100 miles to the west in Polk County's Green Swamp. Wilder, a Boynton Beach businessman sought in connection with several abductions, rapes and murders of beautiful young women, has been named a suspect in her murder. Wilder has not been seen in Palm Beach County since mid- March.
"We're not discounting it and we're not counting it at this point," FBI agent Clifford Botyos said of the similarities the Leppert disappearance shares with the abductions linked to Wilder.
Leppert, who specialized in posing for swimsuit ads and played bit parts in Scarface and Spring Break, left her house barefoot and without money, wearing a blue denim skirt and blue blouse. Her hair, her mother noticed, had not been combed.
"She was a neatnik. She never went any place without her shoes and her hair combed," said Linda Curtiss, Leppert's mother and the owner of Galaxy Model Workshop in Merritt Island.
"See you in a little bit, Mom" were the last words she heard from her daughter, Curtiss said Wednesday.
Leppert, whose resume lists Miss Teen Florida and Miss Sun and Surf titles among her accomplishments, drove away with a male friend, who later told police he left her outside a Cocoa Beach bank after an argument.
Curtiss said a man who strongly resembles Wilder visited her modeling agency on several occasions last year. "He's been in there looking for models, a man who looks very much like him. If it's not him, it's someone who looks so much like him, he's a twin," she said.
Botyos, assigned to Cocoa Beach, said Wednesday that he has not established a link between Leppert and Wilder.
"She's a model, that's a common characteristic," he said. "There's always that possibility, but at this point there's nothing definite."
Police searching for Wilder, 39, say he was last spotted April 3 in Lomita, Calif., south of Los Angeles. During his cross-country trek, he has reportedly used the name of L.K. Kimbrell, his business partner, at several motels.
The Australian-born Wilder and Kimbrell own a construction business in Boynton Beach. Wilder's hobbies include race car driving and photography.
Recently added to the FBI's "Ten Most Wanted" list, Wilder is sought in connection with the disappearances of Rosario Gonzalez, 20, missing from the Feb. 26 Miami Grand Prix, and Beth Kenyon, 23, last seen with him at a service station in Coral Gables nine days later.
He is also a suspect in the case of 19-year-old college student who was abducted from a Tallahassee shopping center, beaten, raped and tortured. The Fort Pierce woman escaped in Georgia.
Investigators believe Wilder checked into a Las Vegas motel March 31 and left April 1, the day 17-year-old Michelle Korfman disappeared from a Seventeen magazine beauty contest accompanied by a man matching Wilder's description.
California Assemblyman Richard Robinson, whose wife is Korfman's cousin, Wednesday placed a full-page ad in The Sacramento Bee. The ad was designed like a wanted poster and featured four pictures of Wilder.
Wilder is also a suspect in the murder of 21-year-old Suzanne Wendy Logan, whose body was discovered March 26 at Milford Lake in Kansas, and the death of Terry Diane Walden, a 23-year-old nursing student found March 26 in a canal near Beaumont, Tex.
Police believe he may also be involved in the abduction of 18-year-old Sheryl Bonaventura at a shopping center March 29 in Grand Junction, Colo.
Wilder is no longer a suspect in the Florida case of 26-year-old Virginia Scott of Jackson County. Investigators originally thought Scott had been abducted March 3, but Doug Jones, an FBI spokesman in Jacksonville, said the investigation has been discontinued.
"We have developed information that there was not an abduction of Miss Scott. Unless we see information to the contrary, we are no longer going to continue the investigation," Jones said.
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PorchlightUSA
Posted: Mar 25 2008, 11:12 AM


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Decades later, pain remains
Billy Cox
Staff

Sad vigil drags on for 2 Brevard families

By Billy Cox

Florida Today

Wednesday's reunion of 15-year-old Elizabeth Smart with her parents in Utah was widely hailed as "miraculous" in the wake of her June 2002 abduction.

For the families of two teenagers who disappeared from Cocoa Beach decades ago, however, only false hopes -- not miracles -- have shaped their ordeal.

On April 28, 1977, 13-year-old Keith Fleming was last seen walking southbound along A1A, just north of State Road 520, several miles north of his house. On July 6, 1983, 18-year-old Tami Lynn Leppert of Rockledge vanished after being dropped off by a friend at the "Glass Bank" in Cocoa Beach.

Although the trails remain cold, the Cocoa Beach Police Department still regards them as open cases, said Lt. Bud Ayers of the criminal investigation division. Leads continue to trickle in, mainly to the Leppert file, thanks largely to an "Unsolved Mysteries" show that premiered in 1992 and continues to air in syndication. All have been dead ends.

More awareness

"The world's a different place than it was back then," says Ayers, an 18-year law enforcement veteran. "There wasn't the awareness that we have today. I'm not even sure they had the term sexual predator in those days."

All that changed in the years following the kidnapping and murder of 6-year-old Adam Walsh in 1981. The boy's father, John Walsh, led a movement that resulted in a nationwide missing-children database, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, the milk-carton ID campaign, and "America's Most Wanted," one of law enforcement's most useful television resources.

In Dallas, Leppert's stepfather, Richard Leppert, couldn't help but think about his own daughter when the Smarts received their good news on Wednesday. It also magnified his loss.

"I loved Tami so much," Leppert says. "She was my baby. I haven't really held out any hope for her for a long time now. But I took out the pictures I have."

Leppert's ex-wife, Linda Curtis, went to her grave in 1995 without a resolution. A talent agent, she had groomed Tami to be a model and an actress, and the teen had made cameo appearances in films such as "Spring Break" and "Scarface." From her deathbed in an Orlando hospital, Curtis made a final plea through Florida Today for closure as she succumbed to kidney and liver failure at age 54.

"I don't want anyone to feel sorry for me, but if that's what it takes to get the right person to come forward, that's OK," she said...

snip
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PorchlightUSA
Posted: Jun 5 2008, 12:19 PM


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Bump for Tammy!
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suzanne
Posted: Aug 27 2008, 01:49 PM


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Hi
If I may please put tammy's myspage page I made her a few years ago.

http://www.myspace.com/findtammy

suzanne
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suzanne
Posted: Jan 28 2009, 08:56 PM


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Hi
If I may please put this here.My son mikey and I made a video for I care missing persons cold cases and put my sister tammy leppert in it.We are not professionals.But it came from our hearts.Thank you for helping me make it honey.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYssZpRo27Q
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suzanne
Posted: Jan 28 2009, 09:00 PM


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Hi
My son mikey and I also made this youtube video for tammy because alot people do love her and want to know if she is ok.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mWsUIkaWCo

suzanne
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PorchlightUSA
Posted: Apr 18 2009, 06:27 AM


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February 25, 1985
Florida Today
MODEL'S WHEREABOUTS REMAIN A MYSTERY
When local actress and model Tami Lynn Leppert climbed into a car with a friend almost two years ago, her mother thought she was going to the 7-Eleven convenience store.
"Bye Mommy, I'll see you in a little bit, ok?", the 17-year-old said as she left the house the day she disappeared. She was barefoot and without a purse.
Outside her home, she hopped into a car driven by a man named "Keith". He said he dropped her off about two blocks south of the Glass Bank in Cocoa Beach after they had a fight, said Linda Curtis, the teenager's mother.
Searching for some sign of Leppert, Curtis said she checked with the teenager's friends, but none of them had seen her, she said. Hours slipped into days without any sign of Leppert.
Police have yet to find clues leading to Leppert's whereabouts. She was last seen on July 6, 1983, near a Cocoa Beach shopping plaza.
The only information Cocoa Beach Detective Harold Lewis has received since her disappearance were two telephone calls from a woman who said that Leppert was still alive.
"When the woman called the first time, she said that Tami Leppert was well and would contact us when the time was right," Lewis said.
"During the second call, she said that Tami was doing what she always wanted, going to school to become a nurse."
Lewis said he does not suspect foul play in connection with Leppert's disappearance.
"I have a gut feeling that Tami just split," Lewis said.
But Leppert's mother dismissed that possibility. The teenager grew up in Brevard and had no reason for leaving her family and friends here, Curtis said.
And the idea of Leppert going to nursing school is impossible, she added.
"They could have called and chosen any profession except nursing," Curtis said "She (Leppert) is deathly afraid of blood."
During the final scene of the movie "Scarface," there is a bloody shootout, between the movie star Al Pacino, and some soldiers.
Leppert, who has a bit part in the movie, "started crying and almost passed out," when "blood squibs" on the set started popping, her mother said.
"Scarface" was the last movie Leppert appeared in before she disappeared about five months later, Curtis said.
The teenager had been winning talent and beauty contests since age 4 and appeared in a variety of television shows, commercials and movies.
"My daughter has always been spoiled by society standards," Curtis said "There's nothing the child ever wished for that she didn't get."
"Most kids want to meet a movie star, let alone be in a movie", she said "Most kids want to be a model let alone have several modeling assignments."
Last May, Curtis filed a $1 million wrongful death suit against the estate of Christopher Bernard Wilder, a Boynton Beach contractor police linked to the abduction, rape or murder of at least 12 women.
In the lawsuit, Curtis charged that Wilder abducted and possibly killed her daughter, who disappeared almost eight months before Wilder began his nationwide killing spree that ended with his own death.
Wilder died April 13, 1984, during a scuffle with police in New Hampshire.
Authorities could never prove that Wilder was connected to Leppert's disappearance, according to Lewis.
Curtis still wonders what happened to her daughter. But she said she is slowly coming to the realization that Leppert probably is dead.
"Indications are pretty good that she's probably not with us, and if she is, she doesn't know who she is," Curtis added.
Leppert had been undergoing emotional and physical problems and had told several friends that someone was trying to kill her days before she vanished, Curtis said.
Her daughter was so paranoid before she disappeared that she could have gone with someone who offered her protection, according to Curtis.
With an inkling of hope, however, Curtis says she will continue her search.
"When a mother's looking for her daughter, there's nothing she won't go through to find her."
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