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*Asian female BERTIE MAE (34) was euthanased last week at Six Flags DK, Vallejo CA, following a "non-recoverable injury in her hind leg". **Following the death of CHERIE in Samburu, Kenya, her 5-month old bull calf has been rescued by DSWT, airlifted to the Nairobi nursery, and given the name SOKOTEI after the salvatora bushes in which he was located.
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 Elephants and PTSD, Elephants and PTSD
Space4Eles
Posted: Aug 31 2011, 02:58 PM


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Article and video from 4 November 2010:

Elephants: PTSD And Killing People

The Psychological Effects Of Killing Elephants

As elephants possess sophisticated brains and are highly intelligent, traumatic events such as seeing family members being killed by people can have long-term psychological effects.

It is now believed that elephants can suffer Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) making them the only other animal besides people to do so. In many ways this shouldn’t be surprising given what we know about their memory capabilities.


http://yellowmagpie.com/elephants-ptsd-killing-people/


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"They need to move and have stimulation. They need to be browsing, foraging, socialising. They need to have reason for movement." Pat Derby, PAWS, on elephants' needs.
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t&tt
Posted: Aug 31 2011, 06:50 PM


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VIDEO: 20/20: Under an Elephant's Tough Exterior - 2008
http://abcnews.go.com/video/playerIndex?id=5454083 --- Alt URL: http://tiny.cc/elephant-experience
Excellent video overview on elephant culture, trauma, and PTSD. Featuring Dr. Gay Bradshaw , Dame Daphne, Carol Buckley, and Scott Blais. 15 mins.

BOOK: Elephants on the Edge : What animals teach us about humanity, 2009

ARTICLE: Elephant Breakdown Bradshaw, Schore, Brown, Poole, Moss. Nature, 2005 Feb; 433(7028):807.


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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t&tt
Posted: Aug 31 2011, 06:58 PM


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Posted Jun 16, 2011 by spiritedlulu

Animals and Love: Exclusive Excerpt From Exultant Ark

Despite our similar biology, it doesn’t necessarily follow that whales or elephants can feel love in the manner that we can. But we cannot take for granted the complexity of these animals’ social behavior. Elephants are more easily studied than whales, and like whales they are long-lived, large brained, and strongly social. They appear to be vulnerable to the same sorts of long-term psychological conditions that may afflict humans who have suffered mental or physical trauma: there is solid evidence emerging that they feel emotions relating to grief at loss and to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Poaching and so-called elephant culls have left many orphaned elephants in the care of compassionate humans. Growing up with the traumatic memories of terror and the loss of a mother or another close companion, exacerbated by the dearth of nurturing that only a mother can provide, these orphans show the classic symptoms described in human PTSD patients, including sleep disorders, reexperiencing (including what appear to be nightmares), loss of appetite, irritability, and hyperaggression. These are not pleasurable feelings, but brains that are capable of them might be capable of feelings of love too. And needless to say, love isn’t all about pleasure. The emotions felt toward a loved one can quickly turn to grief, anger, or resentment, depending on circumstances.

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/06/...nt-ark-excerpt/


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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t&tt
Posted: Aug 31 2011, 07:04 PM


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Posted Jul 20, 2011 by Rowan Morrison

For Immediate Release
Wednesday, July 20, 2011
Contact: Marianne Bessey, 610-733-1248
Attn: News Desk

Traumatized Elephants to be Bred at Pennsylvania Facility
Deaths of Three Handlers Tied to Elephants Imported from Botswana


Philadelphia, Pa. – Three wild-caught elephants from Botswana, survivors of a cull in Kruger National Park in South Africa where their families were massacred in front of them, were moved last weekend to a facility in Somerset PA where they reportedly will be bred. Already confined at the facility are Philadelphia Zoo-owned elephants Kallie and Bette, and the Pittsburgh Zoo’s bull elephant Jackson.

The three new Pennsylvania residents, Thandi, Sukuri and Seeni, along with a fourth bull elephant, Shaka, had been popular tourist attractions in Botswana. There, they were rented out for “elephant walks” where tourists would pay to walk through the bush alongside them. In April 2008, elephant handlers Chandan Alahakoon and Piyal Pedige were killed by the elephants while out in the bush. After the trainers’ deaths, the Botswana government required Shaka to be euthanised, even though it was reported that it wasn't certain which elephant killed the handlers. The three surviving elephants were then moved to the Oksavange Delta in Botswana. Shortly thereafter, the elephants killed 32-year-old trainer Nathan Jamieson in October 2010.

Post Tramautic Stress Disoder (PTSD) is a disease acknowledged by many experts to exist in elephants, resulting in aggressive behavior. Joyce Poole, research director at the Amboseli Elephant Research Project in Kenya and her colleagues claim that many elephants are suffering from PTSD brought on by experiencing stress at an early age. Dr Felicity de Zulueta, a consultant psychiatrist at the Maudsley Hospital in London, who specialises in trauma therapy and grew up in Uganda with an orphaned elephant as a pet, said that one cause of PTSD in humans is the failure of a child to bond or “attach” properly with its primary carer. “Prematurely separating an elephant from the family tribe will have very powerful effects in terms of the attachment system. One of these effects would be aggression,” she said. Oregon State University professor Gay Bradshaw has stated that the loss of social structure in elephants due to mass cullings and devastation of their herd structure through human encroachment results in PTSD in wild elephants.

“The incredible irony is that the Pittsburgh Zoo is spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to bring three traumatized elephants to the U.S. in order to breed them in the name of ‘conservation,’ while at the same time entire herds are being killed in Africa due to an alleged overpopulation of elephants there ,” said Marianne Bessey, founder of local grassroots group Friends of Philly Zoo Elephants. “For a fraction of the cost, entire herds of elephants in Africa could be protected.”

On another note, local activists continue their crusade to relocate Philadelphia Zoo-owned elephants Kallie and Bette to a true sanctuary: this Saturday, activists will convene in front of the zoo during the annual "alefest" where exotic animals and drunk partygoers will intermingle.

WHEN: Saturday, July 23, 2011, 6 pm to 7 pm.
WHERE: Public Sidewalk in front of the Philadelphia Zoo, 3400 Girard Avenue, Philadelphia


Please see www.ElesAngels.com for more information.


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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t&tt
Posted: Sep 8 2011, 10:19 PM


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Excellent point here from Bradshaw, et al.:
"Neuroscience has demonstrated that all mammals share a ubiquitous developmental attachment mechanism and a common stress regulating neurophysiology. Now, a wealth of human–animal studies and the experiences of human victims of violence are available to help elephants and other species survive." Nature, 2005
http://allanschore.com/pdf/SchoreBradshawN...ntbreakdown.pdf

The research of psychiatrist, Sandra L. Bloom, has shown that the captivity of inpatient psychiatric patients (trauma survivors) made them worse.

"Keeping in mind that a majority of people we serve with severe psychiatric symptoms are thus described, what happens when they are secluded or restrained? They tell us that they experience shame, guilt, and humiliation. Their fear increases, and they have a sense of abandonment, helplessness, and vulnerability. They express feelings of fear, rejection, and anger. They feel punished and confused, and their bitterness and anger persist long after the event. (Wadeson et al., 1976; Martinez, 1999; Mann et al., 1993; Ray et al., 1996; Mohr, 1999; National Executive Training Institutes.)…. [Sounds like Dame Daphne talking about elephants: see 5:55, http://tiny.cc/elephant-experience.]

Trauma-informed systems are structured to incorporate what we know about the incidence and neurobiology of trauma into the experience of mental health treatment––and they include the point of view of the people they serve. Above all, they recognize that coercion causes further trauma and alienation (Najavits, 2003)….

The trauma history addresses experiences of past or current trauma, violence, and abuse….

Treatment environments that are coercive, disrespectful, and marked by power and control relationships indicate uninformed systems."


http://tiny.cc/restraintandseclusion


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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t&tt
Posted: Sep 11 2011, 09:37 PM


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Elephants Attack as Humans Turn Up the Pressure, Nat Geo, 2005
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/20..._elephants.html

Elephants never forget . . . and cannot forgive, Feb 2006
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/worl...ticle731367.ece[/URL]

Post-traumatic stress and elephants in captivity. Bradshaw, G.A. and L. Linder, 2006.
http://www.elephants.com/joanna/Bradshaw&L...er_PTSD-rev.pdf

'They're Like Us,' Elephant Researchers Say, ABC 20/20, 2008
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=5435466&page=1
Video: http://tiny.cc/elephant-experience

see also: Dr. Gay Bradshaw
http://z13.invisionfree.com/Elephant_Comme...hp?showtopic=69


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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t&tt
Posted: Oct 8 2011, 01:33 PM


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"Case in point is the plight of African elephants brought to light by Gay Bradshaw in her recent book Elephants on the Edge (2009). In it she details a disturbing phenomenon of documented abnormal behaviors (i.e. poor mothering, hyperaggression, increased conflict with humans, etc.) in elephants. She provides a cogent analysis of the causes of the situation by noting that human activities, including those that are considered “conservation measures” are disrupting the psychological development of the elephants and leading to deregulation of their social behavior. She points out that, as highly intelligent emotional social mammals, elephants are vulnerable to psychological trauma from the loss of family members and violence as we are. The result is an all-too-familiar pattern of individual trauma and breakdown in social relations within elephant groups much in the same way that psychological trauma and disturbance produces dysfunctional human families and groups."

http://onthehuman.org/2010/11/trans-species-perspective/, Marino, 2010


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Space4Eles
Posted: Oct 9 2011, 11:26 AM


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Thanks again, t&tt, for your contribution.

I have this underlying suspicion - which I think I have voiced before - that, because elephants are comparatively large and bulky animals, people in general regard them as strong in every aspect of their being.
We know that this is not the case.
They may be potentially physically strong as adults, but emotionally and psychologically they are very vulnerable throughout their lives (whether spent in their natural surroundings or in captivity) and, indeed, from the evidence of many news reports (and not least from the accounts of, for example, Daphne Sheldrick at DSWT, Edwin Wiek at WFFT, Katherine Connor at BLES), their physical strength also can be easily severely undermined and compromised.

Zoos and circuses and other facilities which interfere with - even destroy - the natural balance, health and wellbeing of elephants are slow to acknowledge the PTSD condition because it is not in their interests to do so. IMHO ...


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"They need to move and have stimulation. They need to be browsing, foraging, socialising. They need to have reason for movement." Pat Derby, PAWS, on elephants' needs.
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spiritedlulu
Posted: Oct 10 2011, 10:25 AM


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This article by Bradshaw and Buckley appeared in the Journal of Archetype and Culture, volumn 83, Spring, 2010.

http://www.carolbuckley.com/pdf/Buckley_Bradshaw.pdf and is available from Amazon: Spring #83 Minding the Animal Psyche (Spring: A Journal of Archetype and Culture) [Paperback]

The article begins (perhaps it must be said that Flora Circus used bullhooks, on Flora-one Lucky Elephant-and on Dondi, the elephant which replaced Flora in the Flora Circus):

"The zoo elephants were taught to never, ever touch the bullhook, the
razor-sharp, pointed steel prod used to control elephants in captivity. One
day the elephant Amy knocked the bullhook out of a keeper’s hand and it
flew across the yard. The keeper ordered Amy to retrieve the bullhook, telling
her, “Amy, go pick up the bullhook.” Amy hesitated and was ordered to again
and again until she finally complied. Once near the bullhook, Amy was
ordered to “pick up the bullhook.” She didn’t. The keeper repeated the order.
Finally, Amy picked up a stick. The keeper said, “Amy, no, pick up the
bullhook.” Amy found and picked up another stick-like item. Again, she
was ordered to pick up the bullhook. Finally, Amy picked up the bullhook
and then began repeatedly hitting herself on the head with it.
—American zookeeper1"



http://s13.invisionfree.com/Elephant_Comme...p?showtopic=356


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What you are seeing in a zoo is NOT an Elephant. What you are seeing is a Tragedy. - Dame Daphne Sheldrick
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t&tt
Posted: Oct 10 2011, 03:38 PM


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QUOTE
Zoos and circuses and other facilities which interfere with - even destroy - the natural balance, health and wellbeing of elephants are slow to acknowledge the PTSD condition because it is not in their interests to do so. IMHO ...


Couldn't agree more, s4e. Causing a being to suffer from helplessness and emotional trauma through loss of agency is about infliction of distress. It solidifies the existence of a perpetrator/victim mentality which unknowing "good" people/institutions don't want want to admit to. The understanding of PTSD brings the cartesian model of thinking we've all been programmed with since the 17th century into moral question. This trans-species science paradigm is the new direction. It will take time for change but I believe our voices demanding this change will drive progress. The advent of social media is creating new acceleration of social change never seen before. Just like you posted on Oct 2 in Carol Buckley's blog: "The wave of change has begun!"


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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Space4Eles
Posted: Oct 16 2011, 12:45 PM


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Article from 17 November 2008, but worth posting here, I think:

Animal welfare: Classical music soothes the wanderlust of zoo elephants
Playing Elgar, Puccini and Beethoven to the animals reduces abnormal behaviours such as swaying, pacing and trunk tossing


The team report in the journal Animal Welfare that the frequency of abnormal behaviours dropped dramatically while the music was playing whereas normal behaviours, such as feeding, remained unchanged ...

... It may simply be that it masked unpleasant background noises – for example from the zoo's visitors.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2008/nov...cal-music-elgar



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"They need to move and have stimulation. They need to be browsing, foraging, socialising. They need to have reason for movement." Pat Derby, PAWS, on elephants' needs.
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t&tt
Posted: Oct 26 2011, 01:00 AM


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Beautifully articulated post by Bradshaw on her blog: Bear In Mind

It's about species-wide PTSD and captivity. Elephants mentioned.

"In captivity....[h]umans are the source of food, water, and life itself, yet also an instrument of threat and death."

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/bear-i...d-does-not-sing


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Space4Eles
Posted: Nov 1 2011, 08:05 AM


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Revisiting Gay Bradshaw’s Work

Gay Bradshaw is founder and executive director of The Kerulos Center. Her founding of the field of trans-species psychology – the theory and practice of animal psychological rehabilitation and conservation – began with the discovery of PTSD in wild elephants. This is the subject of her new book, Elephants on the Edge: What Animals Teach Us About Humanity (Yale 2010). Much of her research focuses on the effects of violence on and trauma recovery of parrots, elephants and chimpanzees. Bradshaw’s research specializes in elderly individuals who have suffered capture and captivity ...

Unlike many humans, animals show a tremendous capacity to forgive. Elephants who have been separated from their families and had their families slaughtered still show an incredible capacity for acceptance and generosity of the heart.


http://www.izilwane.org/revisiting-gay-bradshaws-work.html




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"They need to move and have stimulation. They need to be browsing, foraging, socialising. They need to have reason for movement." Pat Derby, PAWS, on elephants' needs.
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t&tt
Posted: Nov 6 2011, 07:13 PM


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Hippocampus (or should I say, elephant-campus)

Elephants...have also been shown to suffer psychological flashbacks resembling post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).... Elephants, it turns out, have an unusually large and convoluted hippocampus, a region in the brain particularly involved in emotion. In elephants, the hippocampus comprises 0.7% of the central structure of the brain, compared to just 0.5% in humans and 0.1% in dolphins, another highly intelligent and emotional mammal. Memory is stored in the temporal lobe (structure 1a, left), which is especially large and distinct in the elephant. Their particularly developed spatial memory may account for their tendency toward flashbacks and incredible ability to traverse long distances by memory.

http://www.labspaces.net/blog/1522/Hippoca...lephant_campus_

Nice brain images. Blogger is a PhD graduate student in neuroscience.


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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t&tt
Posted: Nov 8 2011, 04:55 PM


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Not by Bread Alone: Symbolic Loss, Trauma, and Recovery in Elephant Communities, 2004, Bradshaw

"The framing of recent trauma theory compels conservationists to create new relationships-neither anthropocentric nor - power based - with nonhuman animals."

http://www.kerulos.org/projects/elephant_p...ne_Bradshaw.pdf


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Space4Eles
Posted: Nov 14 2011, 11:59 AM


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I have just posted a link to this article on the Heroes for the Elephants forum, Carol Buckley topic, because it refers in large part to Carol and the Elephant Sanctuary. But I think it deserves a place here also.

Elephants, Trauma and the Ego
Posted on November 14, 2011 by jeffreymasson


http://jeffreymasson.wordpress.com/2011/11...ma-and-the-ego/


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"They need to move and have stimulation. They need to be browsing, foraging, socialising. They need to have reason for movement." Pat Derby, PAWS, on elephants' needs.
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t&tt
Posted: Nov 15 2011, 10:20 PM


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Post re: Humphrey, the hippo (killed his owner) and Bradshaw's biculturalism/PTSD connection.
http://z13.invisionfree.com/Elephant_Comme...ndpost&p=485851


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t&tt
Posted: Dec 1 2011, 09:28 PM


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Not eles but I think it's important to realize how much recognition PTSD is getting in military dogs:

Military dogs taking Xanax, receiving therapy, for canine PTSD
http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/milit...-222819057.html

After Duty, Dogs Suffer Like Soldiers
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/02/us/more-...ml?_r=1&src=twr


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Space4Eles
Posted: Dec 13 2011, 07:06 AM


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I don't see this link posted here - apology if I have overlooked it.
The article by Gay Bradshaw and Jill Robinson deals specifically with bears, but Carol Buckley's work with elephants is mentioned.

THE JOURNEY HOME
RECOVERY AND RENEWAL IN SANCTUARY


http://kerulos.org/newsletter/2011.02/GABr...Section%201.pdf


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"They need to move and have stimulation. They need to be browsing, foraging, socialising. They need to have reason for movement." Pat Derby, PAWS, on elephants' needs.
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t&tt
Posted: Dec 13 2011, 10:03 PM


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Incredible find, s4e! Bradshaw is just brilliant. So much to be gained from reading everything she writes. Thank goodness the world has her.


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t&tt
Posted: Dec 26 2011, 01:07 AM


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From Bradshaw article posted Nov 1:

"Animals are quite specific in their reactions to each other. Violence is used very parsimoniously in the animal world. Lions kill infrequently and they do so to eat….. In contrast to modern human society fraught with violence and conflict, wildlife societies are prosocial, empathetic, cooperative, and psychologically healthy...." -- Dr. Gay Bradshaw
http://www.izilwane.org/revisiting-gay-bradshaws-work.html

"…Other species do not deliberately inflict uncontrollable, inescapable pain. Only humans do this — in the psych lab, in abusive families, in prisons, and in the extreme sadism of sexual psychopaths. Deliberate cruelty and the instrumental use of others is the sole province of homo sapiens. …Tonic immobility – the ‘last chance’ animal defense — is of little or no help when the predator is human." -- Dr. Paul F. Dell
http://understandingdissociation.com/2010/...redator-part-i/


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t&tt
Posted: Jan 11 2012, 09:43 PM


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PTSD connections to herpesvirus and immune function:

See post in EEHV: http://z13.invisionfree.com/Elephant_Comme...ndpost&p=662084


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t&tt
Posted: Feb 2 2012, 02:18 AM


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Learned helplessness

A trauma-survivor blogger describing "learned helplessness" in people and elephants (as a metaphor). Eloquent cross species connections that offer insight.

http://www.bradenbryce.com/category/complex-ptsd-bpd/


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Space4Eles
Posted: Mar 27 2012, 01:02 PM


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Thanks to a member of TEC Facebook for this link re the Cameroon massacre:

Psychologist Says Elephants Suffer Post-Traumatic Stress

“Essentially, you’re seeing a culture under siege,” Gay Bradshaw said to Here & Now’s Robin Young. “You have the trauma, the shock, as well as the breakup of the society, which has profound psychological effects.”

http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2012/03/27/elep...-post-traumatic


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"They need to move and have stimulation. They need to be browsing, foraging, socialising. They need to have reason for movement." Pat Derby, PAWS, on elephants' needs.
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t&tt
Posted: Mar 27 2012, 01:02 PM


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More notable quotes from above article.

...What happens in elephant culture after a genocide is not unlike what happens in human societies....

“Trauma does not just go away,” she says. “It passes through the generations. It passes through socially, culturally as well as neurobiologically. So we have lessons, unfortunately, from our own human history, of different genocides and war. And we actually see, very sadly, the scars that violence leaves on the bodies and brains of people, and now we understand with other animals.”
- Dr. Gay Bradshaw

http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2012/03/27/elep...-post-traumatic

Be sure to listen to the 9 min. audio interview:
http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2012/03/27/elep...raumatic/player


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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t&tt
Posted: Apr 24 2012, 04:36 AM


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Quotes, etc. from Dr. Judith Herman MD, Harvard traumatologist, leading expert on trauma and CPTSD

“Trauma is so much more than an anxiety disorder. It’s a relational disorder, it’s a…shame disorder, it’s a dissociative disorder, it’s a disorder of disempowerment and disconnection.”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=681nWBL0RRA

Explanation of PTSD/CPTSD (incls both human & animals) (25:00-29:15)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USTKmffoQms

“Ultimately you’re talking about horrible abuses of power. You’re talking about the atrocious things that one person does to another…. You’re dealing with very profound questions of human evil, human cruelty, human sadism and the abuse of power and authority. And the antidote to that is the solidarity of resistance; nobody can do that alone….” * (45:28)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USTKmffoQms

“There’s this fantasy that we [therapists] all fall into of…compensation…that if we can just be understanding and kind that in our nurturing relationship…we can compensate (that love will cure)…for the harms that were done.” (8:35)

[CPTSD] “is a long-term recovery…the primary damage is to the self and to the self in relation… those are not short-term treatments.” (5:09)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=681nWBL0RRA


* “The antidote to that is the solidarity of resistance; nobody can do that alone….” And so the elephants stick together in their herds hoping and insisting to be left by themselves.


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Space4Eles
Posted: Apr 25 2012, 08:05 AM


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With Friends Like These

This week, National Geographic aired a documentary describing a plan to address elephant Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Mozambique. [1] The Gongorosa elephants are survivors of humanity’s Anschluss against nature, suffering with a mortality of 95 percent. Similar to Kenyan and South African elephants diagnosed with PTSD seven years earlier, these individuals live day by day in the grip of psychological trauma, in terror of the apex predator, Homo sapiens. [2]

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/bear-i...4/friends-these


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"They need to move and have stimulation. They need to be browsing, foraging, socialising. They need to have reason for movement." Pat Derby, PAWS, on elephants' needs.
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spiritedlulu
Posted: Apr 26 2012, 07:26 AM


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What you are seeing in a zoo is NOT an Elephant. What you are seeing is a Tragedy. - Dame Daphne Sheldrick
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t&tt
Posted: Apr 27 2012, 04:13 AM


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Traumatologists are doctors who specialize in the field of Traumatology. Traumatologists study and treat people exposed to highly traumatic events (like war, terrorist bombings, criminal and family abuse, various forms of deep societal betrayals).

“Almost twenty years of research documents the efficacy of the use of prolonged exposure as an intervention for simple PTSD (Powers, Halpern, Ferenschak, Gillihan, & Foa, 2010). As Courtois (2008) explains, however, while empirical support for these treatments as a preferred intervention in simple PTSD is abundant, the findings do not support their use when dealing with Complex PTSD and in fact, may even be harmful.”
http://ir.stthomas.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi...adpsych_docproj -- Murphrey. (2011). Effective Treatment of Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Early Attachment Trauma.

Traumatologist, Dr. Claude Chemtob talks about how the majority of professionals cannot even see trauma. (This is from a roundtable on traumatology.) (39:30)
"It’s not a secret anymore. After 20 years we now know that if you want to harm somebody’s development expose them to early victimization. Okay?...You want to mess people up there are lots of different ways all these traumatic things lead to VERY BAD outcomes. If somebody told you that if you inject a child with this liquid [of traumatic toxic stress experiences], you’re going to have these bad outcomes, you’d bust down the door. Yet we’re faced with a situation where people don’t see it. And that’s really, really problematic. And that really has an impact, I’d venture to say on our ability to be civilized."
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPep-jyaN9c (45:23)

"Among the most devastating mental health consequences for victims of any crime can be the destruction of basic life assumptions; that one is safe from harm, one is a good and decent person, and the world is meaningful and just (Office for Victims of Crime, 1998)."
http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/07/humantraffickin...ealth/index.pdf

Traumatologist, Dr. Spencer Eth (from same roundtable):
"… I’ve been doing some work with the FDNY with firefighters. And these are extraordinarily resilient people… And I’ve seen so many of them who have never recovered since 9-11. Again the take-home message to me…they have failed multiple treatments by good people. It’s reminiscent of the Vietnam Vets who I attempted to treat and did research to try to develop new treatments who also failed. And there are lots of people who start out strong…whose life trajectory is robust who are never able to overcome severe trauma and our efforts are pathetically inadequate." (1:28:00)

"The more severe the real trauma is the more devastating the consequence…. The people I see who are in the worst shape are the people who have endured the worst life circumstances. …Those are the people who are the walking wounded…. And we also know that even using the best technology, medication, psychotherapies, a variety of sorts, we are not able to put Humpty Dumpty back together again." -- Dr. Spencer Eth (1:25:30)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPep-jyaN9c

The Roundtable of trauma experts is a worthy view though long and rough in some patches to watch.


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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Posted: Apr 29 2012, 06:47 PM


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FYI, Joyce Poole posted on Bradshaw's blog. There has been discourse on the ethics of Poole's actions there.
http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/bear-i...-these/comments


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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