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*2 Houston Zoo Elephant Calves,Baylor & Tupelo treated for Elephant herpes virus**PAWS Says Goodbye To Beloved Asian Elephant Annie ***Woodland Park Zoo to phase out elephant program; relocating Bamboo and Chai to another Zoo
 

 War Elephants Documentary with Joyce Poole, Nominated for an Emmy
spiritedlulu
Posted: Mar 26 2012, 08:15 AM


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Sun Valley Film Festival Announces Winners

Video

http://www.kmvt.com/news/local/Sun-Valley-...-144202305.html

This post has been edited by spiritedlulu on Aug 21 2013, 03:45 PM


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"What surprises me the most is the number of zoo veterinarians and zoo keepers that continue to visit Sauraha but never helped to get these elephants off chains. Seem unconscionable to me."
Carol Buckley, Nepal's Chain-Free Corral Project in Sauraha
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spiritedlulu
Posted: Apr 4 2012, 12:02 PM


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Participants to the 2012 PAWS Summit for the Elephants were treated to a preview of the documentary "War Elephants" and the important work Joyce Poole and her brother are doing there.

Mozambique: 7,000 Tourists Visited Gorongosa Last Year

Muthemba said the film results from work that the Park is undertaking to show local people the need for a healthy relationship with the elephants, and to make communities understand that elephants are not as dangerous as they may think.

"We have a problem in the park with the elephants because they are aggressive towards people, perhaps because of the experience they suffered during the war", he said. "Through this documentary film we hope to promote community education for protecting the elephants. Often people just look at the size of an elephant and think it must be very dangerous. We want to create a new awareness among people".


http://allafrica.com/stories/201204040719.html


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"What surprises me the most is the number of zoo veterinarians and zoo keepers that continue to visit Sauraha but never helped to get these elephants off chains. Seem unconscionable to me."
Carol Buckley, Nepal's Chain-Free Corral Project in Sauraha
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spiritedlulu
Posted: Apr 13 2012, 02:43 PM


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War Elephants

A documentary with Joyce and Bob Poole

To be shown on National Geographic WILD

Sunday, April 22, 2012 at 8:00 PM EST in the USA


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"What surprises me the most is the number of zoo veterinarians and zoo keepers that continue to visit Sauraha but never helped to get these elephants off chains. Seem unconscionable to me."
Carol Buckley, Nepal's Chain-Free Corral Project in Sauraha
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t&tt
Posted: Apr 19 2012, 03:39 AM


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Talking To The Elephants, 3 min video

Joyce Poole lures in a group of female elephants using a recorded elephant distress call.

http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/...-the-elephants/


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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t&tt
Posted: Apr 20 2012, 08:33 PM


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Tonight interview on Nightline!

Elephant Voices page on War Elephants:

Lots of resources. Airdates/times around the world.

On 20th April Bob Poole will talk about War Elephants on ABC Nightline.

http://www.elephantvoices.org/news-media-a...t-geo-wild.html


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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spiritedlulu
Posted: Apr 21 2012, 04:55 PM


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The premiere of the National Geographic documentary War Elephants will air in the US at 8 p.m. ET/PT on 22nd April on Nat Geo Wild. Those located outside the US can find the show's dates and times listed on this page:

http://www.elephantvoices.org/news-media-a...t-geo-wild.html


About War Elephants on National Geographic's website:
"In Mozambique’s Gorongosa National Park, elephants are in crisis: Years of civil war and ivory poaching have left them frightened and hostile toward humans. In a new National Geographic Television film, the world’s foremost elephant researcher Dr. Joyce Poole, in a documentary by her brother, cameraman Bob Poole, works to build trust and retrain the animals away from their violent behavior."





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"What surprises me the most is the number of zoo veterinarians and zoo keepers that continue to visit Sauraha but never helped to get these elephants off chains. Seem unconscionable to me."
Carol Buckley, Nepal's Chain-Free Corral Project in Sauraha
Top
spiritedlulu
Posted: Apr 21 2012, 09:06 PM


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"What surprises me the most is the number of zoo veterinarians and zoo keepers that continue to visit Sauraha but never helped to get these elephants off chains. Seem unconscionable to me."
Carol Buckley, Nepal's Chain-Free Corral Project in Sauraha
Top
t&tt
Posted: Apr 21 2012, 09:11 PM


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The more I'm seeing, the more I am feeling distressed. The Nightline piece was disturbing http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/video/elep...t-ptsd-16177738 “Social workers” would not subject human trauma clients to this type of mental distress in the name of therapy or rehabilitation. The findings of the branch of psychology called traumatology are not being implemented.

As Dr. Gay Bradshaw writes:

"It is a profound ethical violation. Imagine a research study (today) that plays recordings of frightened children screaming to a people or other children who have been subjected to war genocide and killing.

It is an example of the doubling rampant in scientists that I write about (derived from Lifton and the Nazi doctors) see this recent short essay
http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/bear-i...5-minutes-shame

The only collective good it serves are the pockets of scientists. We have lost our souls."


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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spiritedlulu
Posted: Apr 21 2012, 09:36 PM


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A few attendees at the PAWS Summit who saw this documentary will agree with Dr. Bradshaw.


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"What surprises me the most is the number of zoo veterinarians and zoo keepers that continue to visit Sauraha but never helped to get these elephants off chains. Seem unconscionable to me."
Carol Buckley, Nepal's Chain-Free Corral Project in Sauraha
Top
t&tt
Posted: Apr 22 2012, 10:30 PM


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With Friends Like These, Can conservation kill elephants?

However, even the tolerant elephant has limits and one desperately attempts to ward off the invaders by crushing a truck. Viewers are assured that the gunshot was merely fired over the elephant’s head. We wonder in awe at the prosocial restraint exhibited by the Gongorosa elephants, who must at times be hurdled into the oblivion of PTSD flashbacks by researchers’ guns, petrol smell, and predatory stalking by metal monsters.

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/bear-i...4/friends-these


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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irishlass
Posted: Apr 23 2012, 03:43 PM


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I don't think it was made clear WHY the playbacks were being used by Dr. Poole with the Gorgongosa elephants. I am not sure, myself. Just prior to that scene, the narrator talked about the problem of some elephants leaving the protected areas of the park for crop raiding, and that a way must be developed to keep them from crossing the borders. Is it possible that the scientists may use playbacks as a way to "disturb" the elephants enough to stay clear of specific problem areas? Are playbacks any more harmful that other deterrents... bees, hot chili peppers, etc.?

Dr. Poole used a playback with the PAWS elephants at the Conference 2 years ago, and I found the reaction by the elephants to be very upsetting and personally frightening. She used the same playback that was used in War Elephants, of the baby being attacked by a tiger and the rumbling of the adults. The PAWS elephants were clearly very disturbed; spinning, roaring, flapping ears, running up and down the fence line, etc. Myself and a fellow Conference attendee found the playback demonstration to be distasteful to say the least. I read somewhere (Face Book?) that someone noted that observers were laughing during the episode at PAWS, but I can tell you that I certainly wasn't. The elephants were so upset that I backed up several feet, afraid they would come over the fencing somehow.

I think it would be helpful to hear an explanation of the purpose of these playbacks from Dr. Poole. While I understand it may help in understanding their communication, there may be some other basic science/research involved.

But I would tend to agree with Bradshaw that it seems unnecessary and possibly cruel. If they are as intelligent and emotionally traumatized as we think they are, then these playbacks probably don't need to be repeated.

Clearly more information would be helpful.

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t&tt
Posted: Apr 23 2012, 05:35 PM


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"Exposure therapy" (PE) is not recommended for CPTSD (complex ptsd) patients because it can cause harm. It would be unethical to force it on any patient. Clearly playing back distress calls and "stalking" patients is a form of retriggering toxic stress and trauma in CPTSD patients. There are frequent disconnections from professionals that are not traumatologists. This is known in the traumatology field. It's important to keep in mind that Bradshaw is a traumatologist. Poole is not.


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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4elephants
Posted: Apr 23 2012, 08:45 PM


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The ABC Nightline narrator indicates the recording was used to "lure a herd of elephants deeper into the safety of the park"

Gay Bradshaw makes complete sense describing the trauma the elephants endured during film making ---trucks following them day and night, fuel smells, gunshots fired over their heads, charging and damaging vehicles, etc....I have much to learn about PTSD...
Joyce Poole seems to believe repeated contact with the herd will desensitize them, making it possible to have tourist vehicles travel freely in the park, letting the elephants know not all humans are bad...
How great it would have been to have BOTH of these people in discussion at the Elephant Summit!!! What methods would be suggested by Bradshaw to ease human/elephant relations in the park?...In a sense, the Gorongosa elephants as well as many elsewhere in Africa and Asia have been subjected to a continuous holocaust over many years, killing by war, killing for ivory, killing to save crops, killing by trophy hunters, and let's not forget culling!!! Why did Poole select the desensitize method or exposure therapy as it is called below--
I wonder exactly how long Poole was in the park and if elephant behavior has changed as a result...


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t&tt
Posted: Apr 23 2012, 09:18 PM


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I think the first step humans need to make is to stop commodifying them. Putting elephants in a position to create economic viability for the benefit of humans (via tourism in Mozambique’s case) is just another form of exploitation and does nothing to help heal the fractured minds, bodies and souls of these victims of human violence.


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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Space4Eles
Posted: Apr 27 2012, 03:22 AM


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Response from Joyce Poole - 26 April 2012:

Dear Gay,

I awoke this morning to an email from a colleague who has done more to highlight the plight of elephants than almost anyone I know. It read: "I presume you saw this. I am so sorry. How ignorant of her. If it makes any difference, I saw the NGS film and was proud to know you. Hang in there.” Then I read your critique of War Elephants and my role in it and realized how little you understand of who I am and what I stand for. Gay, you and I hold many of the same perspectives on elephants, we have published together, and I admire and respect you for the work you have accomplished. If you had concerns, why didn't you get in touch so that, as colleagues, we could try to find common ground? Why torpedo an elephant spokesperson if you have the best interests of these incredible animals at heart?

We will not be able to save all of Africa’s elephants from the onslaught of poaching and conflict, but by using our collective intelligence and experience we can work together toward a kinder future for those who live in places where they have a chance to survive. I choose to be part of a solution, to put my long experience in Africa and with elephants to work. While I would be so glad if elephants everywhere could be left in peace, doing what they like, in the real world we need to find ways for elephants to survive despite human intervention and encroachment. To habituate elephants to friendly visitors is one way to do that - and done with knowledge and respect, elephants are intelligent enough to adapt and thrive as we have seen in Amboseli, the Mara, Samburu and elsewhere. Elephants learn quickly and they easily can discriminate between their human friends and foes.

Gorongosa National Park and its elephants had been given up for lost, but thanks to the Mozambican Government and the Gorongosa Restoration Project, these elephants have a chance. Their future, though, depends on tourism revenue and I was invited to Gorongosa to assess the elephants and to begin a process of habituation, so that visitors can have peaceful encounters with them. This work would have happened with or without cameras present, but National Geographic expressed an interest in documenting the habituation process and the Gorongosa Restoration Project felt a film would help to highlight the work they are doing and the particular plight of these (and many other) elephants who have survived war.

I approached the Gorongosa elephants as I would any elephants: slowly, and when I saw signs that they were concerned I turned off the engine and sat quietly. The concept is to gain trust by respecting their boundaries. Sometimes I talk to elephants; I always have done and I make no apologies for it. My conscience is totally clear regarding my strategy and my actions. I would never do anything to harm or harass elephants. There were no guns in the car; the incident you mention occurred on the main road on a game drive, coincidently with a ranger in the car, long after the film crew and I had departed. The incident only serves to highlight the necessity of gaining, in a systematic way, these elephants' trust.

Other than charges by some individuals, my experience was that the Gorongosa elephants were, surprisingly, calm. Editing weeks, indeed months, of footage and compressing it to 50 minutes gives the impression of relentless agonistic interaction. The use of long lenses, the pace, the timing, the selection of scenes, their repetition, the script and the music all interact to exaggerate the drama. But that is TV - film production and editing is not my expertise.

I played calls to the elephants for a reason. I have been asked if there is a way to encourage the elephants to use parts of the park that they abandoned years ago. The elephants are needed to open up habitat and kick-start the grazing succession for other species. Our hope is that if elephants hear others on the distant bank of the river they may feel that it is safe to venture there themselves. The calls I played to them were the sounds of normal elephants doing normal elephant things - in this case adults threatening a lion and calling for recruits. I played those particular calls for a purpose - because I thought they were most likely to attract a family group. The elephants responded with excitement and curiosity, not with fear and agitation. And again: I would have used this technique whether a film crew was there or not.

ElephantVoices will be returning to Gorongosa later this year, and in the years to come, and we will use all of these techniques and others to try to secure a future for these elephants. War Elephants gives a tiny window into who these elephants are and through a monitoring and research program we will learn much more. We will continue to do all we can to make sure that there are other places in the wild for elephants, and to work toward an end to the ongoing poaching-crisis. It can be hard going, and full of heart-break, but I believe if we all work together there will still be free-ranging elephants for my great-great grandchildren to experience. At a time when elephants are under tremendous threat, Gorongosa is a place of hope. It is also a place where a team of dedicated conservationists, scientists and filmmakers are coming together to give this small population of elephants a chance. We are proud to be among them.

Joyce H. Poole, PhD
Co-Director, ElephantVoices


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"They need to move and have stimulation. They need to be browsing, foraging, socialising. They need to have reason for movement." Pat Derby, PAWS, on elephants' needs.
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t&tt
Posted: Apr 27 2012, 04:15 AM


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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t&tt
Posted: Apr 29 2012, 06:44 PM


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Truth or Consequences: Will we act In time to save the elephant? , Dr. Gay Bradshaw

So it is the case for the scientific study of elephant minds. We now know what we sought about animal psyches, but will scientists act ethically on this understanding?

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/bear-i...or-consequences

Please note there is a discourse going on in the comments section of Bradshaw's previous post:
http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/bear-i...-these/comments


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People "would rather have a comfortable reality than an accurate reality." - Psychologist & Lawyer, Dr. Bryant Welch
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spiritedlulu
Posted: Aug 21 2013, 03:44 PM


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via ElephantVoices Facebook:

War Elephants has been nominated for an Emmy in this this year's New and Documentary Academy Awards in the category Outstanding Nature Documentary. The winners will be announced on October 1st. War Elephants is also a finalist at the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival in the category Best People & Nature Program. ElephantVoices is proud to have played a major part in the making of this film.

We have also been involved in two of the other films that are finalists at the Jackson Hole Film Festival - National Geographic Televison's Battle for Elephants (Best Conservation Program), and Rattle The Cage Productions & Sea Fox Production's How I Became An Elephant. (Best Children's Program)

We wish them all GOOD LUCK!



https://www.facebook.com/ElephantVoices?ref...location=stream


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"What surprises me the most is the number of zoo veterinarians and zoo keepers that continue to visit Sauraha but never helped to get these elephants off chains. Seem unconscionable to me."
Carol Buckley, Nepal's Chain-Free Corral Project in Sauraha
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